Media Mentions

Media Mentions

Media Mentions highlighting the work of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project

The Law, Rights, and Religion Project maintains an up-to-date list of our media mentions, wherein the work of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project and our scholars and team members are highlighted in academic and popular media.

For Articles, Op-Eds and Papers written by our team members, please access our Articles page.

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Media Mentions, 2018 - 2019

For a list of Previous Media Mentions, contact the Law, Rights, and Religion Project Administrator at (212) 854-0167 or LawRightsReligion@law.columbia.edu

 


Crimes of compassion: US follows Europe's lead in prosecuting those who help migrants

Tania Karas, PRI
June 6, 2019

"Arizona’s aid groups — the smaller ones in particular — fear that if Warren is found guilty, they’ll have to stop serving migrants soup or providing them temporary shelter, said Katherine Franke, director of Columbia Law School’s Law, Rights and Religion Project. She filed an amicus brief in Warren’s case.

'The risks could radiate outward from these particular cases to anybody who may advertently or inadvertently provide aid to a person who doesn't have legal papers,' Franke said. 'They're all worried that the federal government is going to come after them as well for providing aid to undocumented people or to people who are on their way of making an asylum claim.'"


Caring for Migrants Is Not Just Humanitarian Work—It’s Religious Work

Melissa Borja, Patheos
May 30, 2019

"Katherine Franke, director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia Law School, criticized the Department of Justice for its 'contradiction in how they support religious liberty.' Franke, who filed an amicus brief supporting Warren’s religious claims, argued that Warren’s prosecution offers a 'troubling message' to people of faith who, like Warren, 'are interested in the sanctity of life' and demonstrate that concern for life through humanitarian aid to vulnerable people, including migrants."


As Trump's DOJ Prosecutes Aid Worker, Humanitarian Groups Promise Continued Support for Migrants

Asher Stockler, Newsweek
May 29, 2019

“'All of the prosecutions of the No More Deaths activists implicate the kind of basic humanitarian aid that many organizations are giving throughout the country,' Katherine Franke, director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia Law School, told Newsweek. 'By the terms of these charges, if someone puts out food or water or any other aid, they risk federal prosecution.'

Franke, who filed an amicus brief in support of Warren’s religious claim to [humanitarian] aid work, said that the prosecution sends a 'troubling message' to religious workers like Warren 'who are interested in the sanctity of life.'"
 


HHS Rule Allows Religious Discrimination in Health Care

Dana Rudolph, PrideSource, Between the Lines
May 8, 2019

"The Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia Law School has a different take, however. They remind us that, 'Communities and people of faith hold a wide spectrum of views regarding abortion, sterilization and other health services implicated by the rule. In fact, several religious denominations hold that the right to reproductive health care is an essential aspect of religious freedom.' Furthermore, 'The rule violates the religious liberty of all Americans by establishing a formal legal preference for particular religious beliefs, including opposition to abortion and sterilization.'"


The Religious-Liberty War at HHS

Emma Green, The Atlantic
May 7, 2019

Religion does not always compel people to oppose LGBT rights or abortion. “People of faith have a wide variety of views when it comes to issues like abortion and LGBTQ rights,” says Elizabeth Platt, the director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia University. In her view, this new rule unfairly favors a conservative interpretation of religion—and of existing federal statutes. “I don’t think that people’s access to health care and health-care information should necessarily be dependent on their providers’ religious beliefs,” she says.


LGBTQ advocates alarmed at Trump's religious exemption for health care workers

John Reilly, MetroWeekly
May 2, 2019

"...[T]he Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia Law School said that the new rule actually 'violates the religious liberty of all Americans by establishing a formal legal preference for particular religious beliefs, including opposition to abortion and sterilization.'

Noting that different religions, and even denominations within the same religious family, hold differing views on issues like abortion, end-of-life decisions, and the role of governmental interference into private health decisions, the Law, Rights, and Religion Project says the HHS rule openly disregards any health care provider whose beliefs differ from those prescribed by conservative activists.”


Religious Liberty at Stake in Native American Lawsuit

Tanzina Vega, The Takeaway, NPR and WNYC
April 24, 2019

Professor Katherine Franke, Faculty Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project, spoke with Tanzina Vega on a case brought by the Ramapough Lenape Nation against the town of Mahwah, NJ, regarding ancestral land and religious liberty.


Texas Republicans' Push for a Religious "License to Discriminate" is Depressingly Familiar

David Brockman, Texas Observer
April 17, 2019

“Religious liberty rights cannot be absolute,” Elizabeth Reiner Platt, director of Columbia University’s Law, Rights, and Religion Project, told the Observer. “The classic law school example of this is someone who believes in human sacrifice. Not even the most extreme advocates for broad religious liberty rights would argue that the state can or should protect killing as a religious practice.”


Al Otro Lado and the Border Crisis

Law and Disorder Radio
April 15, 2019

Professor Katherine Franke spoke with Law and Disorder Radio on her work with Al Otro Lado at the U.S. Border, addressing the humanitarian crisis at hand. Professor Franke's remarks as part of this week's program of Law and Disorder Radio begin at 33:11.


Activists Are Invoking Religious Freedom to Save Migrants’ Lives

Stephanie Russell-Kraft, The Nation
April 15, 2019

"A system of laws that allows for too many carve-outs and exemptions is a 'serious antidemocratic problem,' said [Professor Katherine] Franke, a leading expert on RFRA.

Religious-liberty protections are also limited to religious actors. Progressives acting for secular moral reasons aren’t eligible for exemptions. 'When we all stand together to defend the rights of migrants or asylum seekers, some people do that because of their faith and many are doing that for not-faith-based reasons,' said Franke. 'Why should the people who have a plausible faith-based reason for their actions be treated differently than those of us who don’t?'

Nevertheless, 'it would be a terrible political move on the part of the left to surrender RFRA as it’s been interpreted through Hobby Lobby to the right wing,' Franke said. 'That doesn’t mean we won’t be careful.'"


Unvaccinated teen's suit claims classroom ban violates his religious rights

Debra Cassens Weiss, ABA Journal
March 21, 2019

In this piece, Debra Cassens Weiss recalls the details that Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project, provided to the Washington Post in reviewing the case of the Kunkel family in Kentucky, in their lawsuit claiming that a public health edict that restricted their unvaccinated child from participating in school activities violated their religious liberty.


God, Country, and Chickenpox: How an Outbreak Entangled One School in a Vaccine Showdown

Katie Mettler, The Washington Post
March 20, 2019 

"Elizabeth Reiner Platt, director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project at Columbia Law School, reviewed the lawsuit at The Post’s request and wrote in an email that she believed the lawsuit could succeed only if 'the family can demonstrate that the state was acting not to protect the health and safety of schoolchildren, but out of animus against the family’s religious beliefs.

This will be a very challenging claim to make, and the family’s argument that an e-mail from the health department stating that its 'primary concern is preventing the spread of this illness to the public’ constitutes ‘remarkable’ evidence of discriminatory animus is unpersuasive,' Platt said."


What's next for No More Deaths after latest convictions of volunteers?

Nicole Ludden, KTAR News
January 24, 2019

"Katherine Franke... said the criminalization of No More Deaths’ humanitarian work can spill over to the work of other aid organizations.

'I think any of the people who are providing social services to a range of communities in southern Arizona, some of whom might include undocumented people, are vulnerable to being prosecuted as well,' Franke said. 'I’ve spoken to some of those people in southern Arizona, and they’re very worried and are watching how these cases go.'"


Leaving water for people dying of thirst could get you prosecuted: Today's Talker

EJ Montini, Courier Express
January 21, 2019

"Katherine Franke, amicus brief: 'It is not the defendants' position that they were barred from applying for a permit to enter the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, rather, they argue, the conditions contained in the permits required them to agree not to engage in religiously motivated conduct. In this sense, the terms of the permit forced them a 'to choose between the tenets of their religion and a government benefit.' "


'Literally What Jesus Told People to Do': In Arizona, Possible Prison Time for Leaving Food and Water for Migrants

Jessica Corbett, Common Dreams
January 21, 2019

"Professor Katherine Franke, faculty director of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project], challenged the outcome on legal grounds.

'Velasco's guilty verdict in the case mirrored the government lawyers' trivialization of the defendants' religious liberty claims, describing them as 'a modified Antigone defense,' she said in a statement. 'He failed to undertake even a minimal legal analysis of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, as the law required.'"


Edith Espinal Has Spent 18 Months Hiding From ICE in a Church. How Much Longer Will The Authorities Let Her Stay?

Stephanie Russell-Kraft, The New Republic
January 17, 2019

"Oliver-Bruno’s deportation came as a shot across the bow. 'I would bet in the next six months, we’ll see them start to move into those sensitive locations,' Columbia University law professor Katherine Franke told me. 'They’ve done it in courts, they’ve done it in schools, and they said they wouldn’t do it there either. I think they’ll start taking the undocumented people and start arresting the hosts.'"


On National Religious Freedom Day, consider the double standard on religious freedom - and why it's a problem

Kelsey Dallas, Deseret News
January 16, 2019

"It will likely take more than a few studies to change how Americans approach religious freedom, Franke said. There's still a lot of confusion about what this right guarantees, and cultural and political factors complicate efforts to address it.

'I think average Americans don't really know what the free exercise of religion means,' she said. 'There are several well-funded advocacy organizations pushing a radical interpretation' that only benefits them."


Ringing in a Christian Nationalist 2019 With an Even Larger Legislative Playbook

Frederick Clarkson, Rewire.News
December 18, 2018

"[Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project] stressed that 'it’s really important to … remind ourselves what religious liberty really is, which is the freedom of individuals and communities to practice their religious beliefs, or to practice no religion, in a pluralistic society, free from government persecution, discrimination, or coercion. So this is a foundational constitutional value, and it’s a progressive value.'"


'Project Blitz': Here's the New Plan Christian Nationalists have to seize even more power

Paul Rosenberg, AlterNet
December 16, 2018

In a reprint of Rosenberg's article from Salon.com, author Paul Rosenberg quotes Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project, from remarks given as part of a webinar on how the Religious Right invokes "Religious Freedom" selectively to promote a White Christian Nationalist agenda.


Christian nationalists have a new plan to seize more power - Meet 'Project Blitz'

Paul Rosenberg, RawStory.com
December 16, 2018

“'The Christian right has been extremely effective over the past five or so years in branding progressives as anti-religious freedom, even while we know at the same time the far right and the Trump administration, is quite overtly attacking religious freedom through the promulgation of Islamophobic policies like the Muslim ban,' [Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project] noted."


Christian nationalists are trying to seize power - but progressives have a plan to fight back

Paul Rosenberg, Salon.com
December 16, 2018

"[Elizabeth Reiner Platt] began with a point that belongs front and center, since everything in Project Blitz rests on its denial...'I wanted to step back and start out by reminding everyone that religious liberty is a progressive value....It's really important to ... remind ourselves what religious liberty really is, which is the freedom of individuals and communities to practice their religious beliefs, or to practice no religion, in a pluralistic society, free from government persecution, discrimination or coercion. So this is a foundational constitutional value, and it's a progressive value.'”


Report: Catholic Healthcare Limits Reproductive Care for Women of Color in Wisconsin

Sean Kirkby, Wisconsin Health News
November 28, 2018

"A wave of healthcare consolidation that has increased the reach of Catholic healthcare facilities could lead to more women of color receiving limited sexual and reproductive healthcare, according to the co-author of a report studying the trend.

Kira Shepherd, Director of the Racial Justice Program at the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project]... spoke at a panel in Milwaukee last month."


The Limits of Catholic Healthcare in Wisconsin

Taryn McGinn Valley, Wisconsin Health News
November 27, 2018

"These religiously imposed standards of care could mean tragedy or trauma for any patient. However, as is the case in many aspects of health and wellbeing, it is communities of color who are disproportionately affected....These trends were recently confirmed by a report from the Columbia Law School [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] in partnership with Public Health Solutions, 'Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color.' The study compared racial disparities in birth rates at hospitals that place religious restrictions on health care, demonstrating a disproportionate impact of ERDs on pregnant women of color."


Church Discipline and Miscarriage Mismanagement at Catholic Hospitals

Lara Freidenfelds, Nursing Clio
November 1, 2018

"The impact of the [Conference of Catholic Bishops' Ethical and Religious] Directives has also been racially discriminatory: earlier this year the Columbia Law School’s [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] documented the lopsided impact of religious restrictions on women of color, who are disproportionately likely to give birth at Catholic hospitals."


Lake Effect Weekend: Ethical Religious Directives Impact

Lake Effect, Milwaukee Public Radio
October 27, 2018

This episode from Milwaukee Public Radio highlights a program Kira Shepherd, Director of the Racial Justice Program, hosted in Milwaukee in October of 2018, discussing the impacts of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project's report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Healthcare for Women of Color."


Masterpiece Cakeshop Case drew $500K in Grants from Religious Freedom foes

Kevin Jones, Catholic News Agency
October 25, 2018

The Catholic News Agency mentions the Law, Rights, and Religion Project in this piece, regarding grant funding for organizations that critically review the use of Religious Exemptions and Religious Liberty bills.


Does freedom of religion protect Americans who have a religious duty to shelter migrants?

Ephrat Livni, Quartz
October 19, 2018

“'There’s a public face of this government, which is very protective of religious liberty, and then the real work they’re doing is only protecting the religious liberty rights of those who are religious conservatives, not of religious progressives,' [said] Katherine Franke, [D]irector of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] at Columbia Law School"


Study Says Women of Color Are Not Adequately Served By Catholic Hospitals

Latoya Dennis, Milwaukee Public Radio
October 17, 2018

"According to a recent report called 'Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care For Women of Color,' 52 percent of black women in Wisconsin give birth at a Catholic hospital.

Kira Shepherd, director of Columbia Law Schools Racial Justice Program, is behind the study."


Wednesday on Lake Effect: Informed Voter, Black Maternal Health At Catholic Hospitals, 'Time Trial'

Lake Effect, Milwaukee Public Radio
October 17, 2018

This feature on Milwaukee Public Radio discusses the impact of the Racial Justice Program's seminal report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Healthcare for Women of Color" with a specific eye cast to communities in Wisconsin.


Are Religious Freedom Claims Subject to Religious Bias and Political Agenda?

Don Byrd, Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty
September 29, 2018

"I emphasized in my post that laws like RFRA are not 'get out of jail free' cards, but that they provide an important legal framework for adjudicating claims for religious accommodation on a case-by-case basis. Also important, however, is that those enforcing the laws treat religious freedom claims without bias, free of political agenda, and without religious favoritism. Those are the themes of an op-ed in the Washington Post today entitled “Religious freedom for me, but not for thee” by Columbia University professor Katherine Franke."


Fighting for Reproductive Justice Within My Faith: Make Christians Act like Jesus Again

Cheyenne Varner, CheyenneVarner.com
September 25, 2018

"When speaker Kira Shepherd from the Racial Justice Program (and more) at Columbia Law began to speak about 'White Christian Supremacy' at [the] Decolonize Birth Conference this weekend, I had a visceral reaction. A skin crawl. A sinking in my gut, in part because I already knew… 

...I knew that during slavery, people who called themselves Christian declared themselves superior over others to justify enslaving them, humiliating them, beating them, scarring them, separating them from their children and families, and killing them."


Religious Exemption Laws Put LGBT Elders at Risk

Serena Worthington, Windy City Times
August 22, 2018

"The report, Dignity Denied: Religious Exemption and LGBT Elder Services is by The Movement Advancement Project, SAGE and the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] at Columbia Law School. The research finds that while many... religiously affiliated facilities provide great care, there is a coordinated and on-going effort to pass religious exemption laws, issue executive orders and agency guidance, and to litigate court cases to allow individuals, businesses, and even government contractors and grantees to use religion to discriminate."


Jeff Sessions' Arkansas trip includes a Little Rock Stop

Max Brantley, Arkansas Times Blog
July 30, 2018

This article from the Arkansas Times highlighting Attorney General Jeff Sessions' work with the Department of Justice regarding "Religious Liberty", and how the vision of "Religious Liberty" advanced by Attorney General Sessions poses harms to multiple marginalized groups. The article cites the report, "Dignity Denied: Religious Exemptions and LGBT Elder Services" produced by scholars from the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project], among other groups.


Trump Administration's Promotion of Religious Liberty Criticized at Home

Masood Farivar, VOA News
July 26, 2018

This report from VOA News highlights the work of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project with partners CAIR-NY and the Center for American Progress regarding President Trump's Executive Order on Religious Liberty and the DOJ's "guidance" on Religious Liberty 

 

SCOTUS Blog: Thursday Roundup

Edith Roberts, SCOTUS Blog
June 28, 2018

"At Rewire.News, Elizabeth Reiner Platt maintains that '[i]n four decisions issued near the end of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2018 term, the Court offered wildly different accounts of the significance of, and its duty to redress, ‘discrimination’ in U.S. law.'"


Crisis pregnancy centers aren't the only ones putting limitations on women's reproductive care

Stephanie Russell-Kraft, The Lily
June 26, 2018

In an analysis of the Supreme Court's decision regarding Crisis Pregnancy Centers in California, Stephanie Russell-Kraft highlights the relevance of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project's research report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color," on the directives and policies that restrict womens' access to full spectrum health care. 


SCOTUS Blog: Wednesday Roundup

Edith Roberts, SCOTUS Blog
June 6, 2018

Elizabeth Reiner Platt's Op-Ed, "Will SCOTUS's New Zeal for Neutrality Affect its Decision on the Muslim Ban?" is highlighted among commentary regarding the case in this week's Wednesday round-up from Edith Roberts, an editor at SCOTUSblog.


"Project Blitz" Promotes Christian Nationalist Agenda in State Legislatures

Scott Harris, Between the Lines
June 6, 2018

Frederick Clarkson, Senior Research Associate with Political Research Associates, spoke on the impact of "Project Blitz" - a series of guidelines for the Christian Right to introduce legislation at the Local and State Level.  Clarkson discussed a recent webinar that Political Research Associates co-hosted with the Public Rights/Private Conscience Project to convene advocates and thought-leaders in addressing concerns about the content and rhetoric of Project Blitz through the development of discourse. Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project, was one of the presenters in the webinar, hosted on Thursday, May 24th.


Supreme Court, in narrow decision, rules for anti-gay baker in Masterpiece Cakeshop Case

Editors, The Wisconsin Gazette
June 4, 2018

The Wisconsin gazette highlights an amicus brief filed in the case of Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission by the National LGBT Bar Association in conjunction and the Law, Rights, and Religion Project, with other signatory parties, in this article following the Supreme Court's ruling in the case.


No Health Care for You!

Abby Scher, The Progressive
June 1, 2018

"That means some of the worst burden of religious refusal has fallen on poor communities and particularly poor communities of color, which rely more on Roman Catholic hospitals. More than 75 percent of the mothers giving birth in New Jersey and Maryland Catholic hospitals are women of color, according to “Bearing Faith,” a [2018] study from Columbia University Law School’s [Law, Rights, and Religion Project]."


Panel Discusses Reproductive Health Care of Women of Color

Elizabeth Moore, Rutgers Law School
May 31, 2018

"'Women of color disproportionately give birth at Catholic hospitals in many states, including New Jersey,' said Shepherd, the director of the Racial Justice Project of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] at Columbia Law School. However, many Catholic hospitals prohibit certain kinds of contraceptive services, which may include sterilization, abortion, contraception or termination after an ectopic pregnancy. "

...

"Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project], said current law protects hospitals who choose not to offer certain services and it is difficult to litigate against them for these practices. She said state and federal laws permit religious exemptions to health care, 'We don’t have a clear legal line where a patient’s health has to take priority.'”


Senate Democrats Strike Back Against GOP's Religious Imposition Agenda

Ally Boguhn, Rewire News
May 24, 2018

"The misappropriation of RFRA started long before Trump became president. As Kira Shepherd, the [Director of the Racial Justice Program, with the Law, Rights, and Religion Project] at Columbia Law School, explained in 2016, 'the U.S. Supreme Court’s overly broad interpretation of RFRA in Hobby Lobby found that certain for-profit entities could avoid compliance with [the Affordable Care Act’s birth control benefit] by claiming a religious objection to doing so. After Hobby Lobby, many feared an increase in the number of people and institutions that would use RFRA and other religious exemption laws to limit the rights of third parties.'"


Trump administration's religious liberty guidance a "license to discriminate"

Julie Moreau, NBC News
April 10, 2018

The report, "Religious Liberty for a Select Few" co-authored by the Law, Rights, and Religion Project and the Center for American Progress is highlighted in this report from NBC News. The report critiques the Trump Administration's proposed guidance on "religious liberty," along with other policies focused on religion brought forth by the Administration.


Comments in Response to Proposed HHS Religious Refusal Rule

The Leadership Conference
March 27, 2018

Kira Shepherd, Director of the Racial Justice Program, and the Law, Rights, and Religion Project's report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color," are cited in this memo in response to the proposed HHS Rule submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services on behalf of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and 15 other organizations.


Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color

Law and Disorder Radio
February 19, 2018

Interview with Elizabeth Reiner Platt and Kira Shepherd, the Director of the Law, Rights, and Religion Project and the Racial Justice Program at LRRP, respectively, spoke with Law and Disorder Radio on the Law, Rights, and Religion Project's report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color." The report shows that in many states women of color are far more likely than white women to give birth at Catholic hospitals. These women are at greater risk of having their health needs undermined because these health needs have been determined by the religious beliefs of male bishops rather than the medical judgment of their doctors.

This religious overreach undermines fundamental rights to equality and liberty and violates the establishment clause of the First Amendment which seeks to separate church from state.


Dignity Denied: Study Finds LGBTQ Seniors are Especially Vulnerable to Religious Exemptions

Eve Kucharski, PrideSource
January 31, 2018

"The study [Dignity Denied, co-authored by the Law, Rights, and Religion Project] found that the majority of healthcare services for the aging are offered by religiously-affiliated organizations — about 85 percent. This affiliation could be part of the reason that LGBTQ older adults have reported discrimination when accessing a variety of services like 'at work, at the doctor’s office, within residential communities and when seeking housing and when accessing social supports like community centers.'"


Making Catholic Hospitals Illegal

Editors, Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights
January 29, 2018

"A recently published report, 'Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color,' is the most anti-Catholic document assessing Catholic healthcare ever published. The authors want to effectively shut down Catholic hospitals, unless, of course, they stop being Catholic. The report is the work of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project], a unit of Columbia Law School."


Refusal (Conscience) Clauses and HHS: A Physician's Perspective

Judy Stone, Forbes.com
January 22, 2018

"There have been several disturbing reports recently of the disproportionately high death rate of pregnant black women compared to whites, with black mothers dying at three to four times the rate of white mothers....

A new report from Columbia Law School, 'Bearing Faith,' adds to that study of disparities, finding that 'women of color are more likely than white women to give birth at hospitals operating under the ERDs' The findings were particularly striking in New Jersey, where women of color make up 80% of births at Catholic hospitals, although are only half of all women of reproductive age. Other states with notable racial disparities were Maryland, New Mexico, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and Connecticut."


Report Says Women of Color Disproportionately Give Birth in Catholic Hospitals in 19 States

Howard Friedman, Religion Clause
January 20, 2018

"The Columbia Law School Public Rights/ Private Conscience Project yesterday released a new report Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color. The study focuses on racial disparities of women giving birth in Catholic hospitals governed by Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services.  According to the report: 'The ERDs forbid hospitals owned by or affiliated with the Catholic Church ... from providing many forms of reproductive health care, including contraception, sterilization, many infertility treatments, and abortion, even when a patient's life or health is jeopardized by a pregnancy'..."


New Report Reveals Pregnant Women of Color More Likely to Receive Religiously Restricted Reproductive Health Care in Many US States

Editors, Public Health Solutions
January 19, 2018

This press release, issued by Public Health Solutions, announces the publication of the report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color," co-authored by the Law, Rights, and Religion Project with Public Health Solutions. The report finds that in many states, women of color are far more likely than white women to give birth at Catholic hospitals, putting them at greater risk of having their health needs determined by the religious beliefs of bishops rather than the medical judgment of doctors.


How Women of Color are Affected by Religious Policies at Catholic Hospitals

Frances Solá-Santiago, People Chica
January 19, 2018

People Chica highlights the Law, Rights, and Religion Project's report, "Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color" and the disproportionate harms the Conference of Catholic Bishops' ERDs (Ethical and Religious Directives) pose to the health and safety of women of color.

"[Elizabeth Reiner Platt] says medicine should take precedence over religious beliefs. 'The long-term effects of the ERDs on these communities could be fatal,' she says. 'Especially for women of color.' [The Law, Rights, and Religion Project] is focused on highlighting racial disparities in Catholic institutions across the country. Furthermore, Platt says the proliferation of Catholic institutions and the ERDs adversely affects queer and transgender individuals as well."


Trump Rule a #LicensetoDiscriminate

RWV Editor, Raising Women's Voices
January 19, 2018

"Today, the Trump administration proposed a sweeping new rule designed to ensure that health care providers – hospitals, insurance plans, doctors, nurses, technicians and even volunteers at hospitals – can refuse to provide medical care to which they have religious or moral objections....
....

The rule was issued on the same day that a new study [The Law, Rights, and Religion Project's, Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color] reported that women of color in 19 states are disproportionately affected by Catholic hospital restrictions on reproductive health care."


How Religious Health Care Hurts Women of Color

Stephanie Russell-Kraft, The New Republic
January 19, 2018

“The findings outlined in [Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color] indicate that women of color are at greater risk of being denied care due to religious restrictions when they need it most—during childbirth,” said Elizabeth Reiner Platt, director of the [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] and co-author of the report.

The extent to which Catholic hospitals are able to act on their ethics directives varies from state to state, where religious refusal laws provide more or less leeway for providers to deny coverage on religious grounds. The laws differ in terms of what procedures they cover, which medical providers are exempted (individual doctors versus the entire hospital), and what the exemptions entail (protection from civil vs. criminal liability)."


Women of Color More Likely to Give Birth in Hospitals Where Catholic Beliefs Hinder Care

Amy Littlefield, Rewire News
January 19, 2018

"Catholic hospitals restrict access to abortion, sterilization, contraception, gender-affirming procedures, and other care under religious directives, which govern one in six acute-care beds nationwide.

A groundbreaking report reveals how women of color... bear the brunt of these restrictions. Researchers with Columbia Law School’s [Law, Rights, and Religion Project] analyzed data from 33 states and Puerto Rico. In 19 of those states, women of color were more likely than white women to give birth at a Catholic hospital. Nationally, 53 percent of births at Catholic hospitals are to women of color, versus 49 percent of births at non-Catholic hospitals.

'Pregnant women of color are more likely than their white counterparts to receive reproductive health care dictated by bishops rather than medical doctors,' the authors wrote in the report, 'Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color.'"